Technology Is the Magic Word for Kelly Wearstler’s New Lighting Line

Photo: Joyce Park

Above: Designer Kelly Wearstler with her new Esfera chandelier Technical lighting, its latest line for Visual Comfort.

If you’re lucky enough to own one of the fixtures of interior designer Kelly Werstler for visual comfort, you’ll be surprised to learn that lighting never touches her head and is one of her favorite products for design.

“Even when I look at a piece of furniture like a table, I always think about how I can turn to the lamp,” says Werstler. “Lighting is such an important part of home life – it really adds depth to your environment and creates mood.”

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

Given recent advances in LED technology, Wearstler has gladly taken on the challenge of expanding its offerings with Visual Comfort, adding an entirely new line it calls Tech Lighting, which includes five collections for initial deployment. Wearstler decided to focus on the ambient lighting from each lamp, as well as on the silhouette of each part, choosing thin profiles that can be shown in pairs or easily stand alone.

“LED lighting has gone so far and we have worked hard to keep the light emitted by these devices warm and beautiful,” says Wehrstler. “The functionality of the LEDs also allowed us to play with materiality and silhouettes.”

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

For the debut of this line, Wearstler and the Visual Comfort team selected a new glass factory in Italy to work with and continued to study the use of various metal finishes, alabaster and stone. For each collection, Wearstler wanted to rethink the usual form of lighting in a minimalist and modern style: the Kulma collection, which can be used both indoors and outdoors, embodies the essence of the lantern; the Esfera collection offers an updated look at the nude light bulb; and the lights in Phobos’ collection resemble thin candles.

The other two collections focus on geometry – Ebell has a glass prism with a dome that is rounded to reduce the intensity of the metal it is paired with, while Cerne highlights warmed glass that floats in round shapes. Whether you choose a table lamp, pendant or concealed lighting fixture, Wearstler suggests using a few to increase the minimum shapes. She suggests that Kulma sconces, for example, line the hallway, or several cylindrical Esfera styles over the dining table.

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

Photo: provided by Visual Comfort

“This collection is really all about architecture,” concludes Werstler. “It definitely has a more modern, abbreviated atmosphere.”

The new Tech Lighting line will be available in March at Circa Lighting.

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