Trades Education is Better When Contractors Are Involved

Have you ever hired an entry-level technician through a trade school, a high school program or a community college? I would assume that many of you have. I also did this, often hiring graduates of different types of programs when owning my own contract business for ventilation and ventilation. With trade skills gap with each passing year increasing, finding experienced employees is becoming more difficult. So when you find new graduates, you jump. But when these “educated” employees start working, what will you learn about how they were trained? I felt that a significant portion was not ready to cope with the many common tasks and challenges that arise on a daily basis.

You probably scratched your head and asked: how could this happen? I know there is. In fact the student is not to blame. They learned why they were taught, and many of those I hired did well in vocational school. What I learned is that accountability rests on the school, in particular on the curriculum they teach and on how they teach it.

Real-world learning

Unfortunately, many training programs are not focused on this real jobs. This is because it is mostly overseen by scientists, not real people working in the field. They do not know what it is like to work in a real workplace, and do not understand what calls are faced by specialists in ventilation, ventilation, electricity, plumbing and other technicians. There’s nothing wrong with scholarly scholars in trade schools, but I think if they don’t require a contribution from a professional merchants and include their offers, it is a bearish service for their students and ultimately the companies that hire them.

One cannot overestimate the importance of the contribution of contractors, the people who will actually hire these graduates.

One cannot overestimate the importance of the contribution of contractors, the people who will actually hire these graduates. During my work as an HVAC contractor, the problem of finding good employees was so difficult that I made the drastic decision to return to teaching at a trade school in the evening so that I could make sure that the courses students took would prepare them for the “real” world and then I would hire them .

Contractor involvement

I found training practical experience using real-world scenarios was the best way to prepare students for work in the field. Contractors who contribute to commercial training can only benefit contractors. Think about it: the end user of all this education is, for the most part, a contractor. Why not help create a curriculum that gives you the results you want?

The end user of all this education is, for the most part, the contractor. Why not help create a curriculum that gives you the results you want?

There are many trade schools advisory boards which meet once or three times a year. It’s not a very intense commitment, but it can bring in a lot of payoff. By contributing to the curriculum, you will not only get students who are willing to work, you will also get a first choice for graduates while you work with the school. No doubt this can help in your competition.

Community relations

The building public relations To find the best employees, you need to contact the heads of high schools, community colleges and trade schools in your community. Once established, these programs are more likely to be kept in mind when they promote graduates looking for work.

Let’s face it, pool qualified job candidates quite small, which creates recruitment problems for most companies. If you want to grow your business, you need to recruit and train a team. But you can’t just hire someone. You need to hire the right people – talented professionals who will properly represent you to your customers and potential customers.

Anything you can do to tip the scales in your favor can only help. Participating in the true education of your future employees can be a great way to find talent in both the short and long term.

Chris Roth is the CEO and owner National Technical Institute (NTI) a state-approved trade school with campuses in Las Vegas, Nevada and Phoenix, Arizona offers rapid training in ventilation, plumbing and electrical engineering. NTI’s mission is to create problem-solving, creative thinking graduates who possess industry standard knowledge and skills for long-term promising careers. Mouth is a licensed contractor for ventilation and ventilation. NTItraining.com

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